diabetes

Major Hospitals Caught in Diabetes Scandal

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SUGARVILLE, TX – The Hershey Memorial Hospital (HMH) has been cited in a nationwide investigation by the CDC.

diabetesThe investigation is a result of patient complaints to the CDC nationwide.  “There have been many, many patients that have contracted diabetes from certain hospitals.  It is not just an issue here in Texas but in the nation as a whole,” said Eve Claire at the CDC.

The CDC explains that after extensive and careful investigation, their results have uncovered issues with patients admitted to hospitals that are not diabetic but at discharge are full-fledged diabetics.

The investigation is ongoing, but the CDC informs us that a patient’s lack of primary care or PCP (primary care physician) is no excuse for this outbreak to be occurring nationwide.  Private investigations and interviews with patients by GomerBlog have confirmed the CDC’s assumptions and the awful truth: Before admission, no diabetes.  At discharge, diabetes.

We interviewed Ms. Candice Crumbe, a recently discharged patient at HMH and new diabetic:

Ms. Crumbe what were you admitted to HMH for?

Well, I was admitted for my bad breathing and my chest was aching.  It felt like I had a four-ton file cabinet on it.  It was terrible.  It all started when I was in the bakery.  I was waiting for my super-sized double-XL deep-fried glazed bear claw.  As I was sipping my double mocha cinnamon brown sugar coated chocolate chip cookie dough latte… all of a sudden… I couldn’t breathe.  They called 911 for me.

When you arrived in the ER what did the staff do for you?

Well, they put some oxygen on me, took some vital signs, started an IV then took an X-ray of my chest.  Then they took blood.  I don’t know why they did that.  It seemed like such a waste of time.  They drew blood on me two days ago when I was in this same ER.  I had the same bad breathing problem then as well.  Why do they need more blood now?  They already have my blood from before.  They should have fixed my breathing the last time I was in the ER.  Now I’m back in here again no thanks to them.

What else did they do for you Ms. Crumbe?

Well, they put these stickers on my chest (like that was suppose to stop my chest ache!) and took a picture of my heart.  They gave me some medicine to take but the told me NOT to swallow it and only hold it under my tongue.

How were you feeling then?

Not bad.  The chest ache stopped but I had a really bad headache afterward.

What happened next?

Well, that’s when they gave me the diabetes.

I’m sorry, can you say that again?

The hospital gave me the diabetes.  They said my “Fonzie levels” were off and that I had the diabetes.

Your Fonzie levels?

Yes, they said my “aaaay one see” was very high and that now I’m a diabetic.  All of a sudden I’m a diabetic.  That is just crazy.  The hospital gave me the diabetes.  I know they gave it to me because I haven’t seen a doctor (heck, I don’t even have one!) in over 25 years and I have been just fine.  I’m healthy!  Last week I was only taken to the ER twice! Now all of a sudden they give me the diabetes for some crazy reason.  I called the CDC to complain.  I don’t want no diabetes.  The hospital can keep their damn diabetes to themselves.  I don’t want it.  I have enough problems with my bad breathing that they can’t seem to fix.

Did you fill out your patient survey after discharge Ms. Crumbe?

You bet I did!  I was mad they didn’t have any baked goods or fancy coffee drinks in the ER.  Not to mention they don’t even have any HBO channels on the TVs!  It’s barbaric down there I tell ya’. This is the USA, not Somalia forcrissakes!

The investigation by the CDC on this matter continues.  Leadership at HMH couldn’t be reached for comment.  Many technicians from Comcast were seen working the ED however.

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  • Show Comments

  • Avatar
    Renee Mott-Pense

    Lol

  • Avatar
    Rebecca Simstein Ginsburg

    Diabetes education lacking to say the least! Drs require patience and patients.

  • Avatar
    Justin Hamlin

    That’s funny, I’m here practicing in the diabetes capital of the world and most of that is inaccurate. But yeah, many of my patients who are already diabetic do think that their meds and insulin buy them a few more cakes a week.

  • Avatar
    Lori Enriquez

    Lots to say …… but will refrain on here!

  • Avatar
    Rebecca Simstein Ginsburg

    Lori Enriquez, I think you should read these comments. As if you didn’t already know you had your work cut out for you!

  • Avatar
    Donna Douthit

    Yes, I know there are official differences in labeling prediabtes, type 1, etc. based on blood glucose levels.

    Most doctors, however, who specialize in the field do not like the terms glucose intolerant, pre-diabetes, or borderline diabetes as those terms miss the point entirely. It is most likely one disease with different levels of impairment. There is an approximately 10 year lead-in time of pathophysiologic damage prior to the glucose being consistently elevated and the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is made. As diabetes is a progressive disorder even when well controlled prompt diagnosis and decisive intervention is essential. Pre-diabetes most likely means ‘early’ diabetes. The initial step is life-style modification. This would include diet modification, weight loss if you are over-weight or obese, and regular exercise. The exercise does not need to be any complicated than walking 20 to 30 minutes daily. When medication becomes necessary, oral hypoglycemics are ordered when BG levels are still low enough not to need insulin. All diabetes is real.

    I don’t mean to be argumentative nor lecturing. But whether you accept that premise or not, my point was that I believed the doctor entered diagnosis for this patient and don’t believe, as the patient did, that his doctor ordered such medication to allow him to eat all the cookies and pastries as well as anything he wanted because the medication would take care of it. Nor do I know any doctor who would order such medication to “prevent the real diabetes” without also recommending other modifications.

  • Avatar
    Donna Douthit

    Yes, I know there are official differences in labeling prediabtes, type 1, etc. based on blood glucose levels.

    Most doctors, however, who specialize in the field do not like the terms glucose intolerant, pre-diabetes, or borderline diabetes as those terms miss the point entirely. It is most likely one disease with different levels of impairment. There is an approximately 10 year lead-in time of pathophysiologic damage prior to the glucose being consistently elevated and the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is made. As diabetes is a progressive disorder even when well controlled prompt diagnosis and decisive intervention is essential. Pre-diabetes most likely means ‘early’ diabetes. The initial step is life-style modification. This would include diet modification, weight loss if you are over-weight or obese, and regular exercise. The exercise does not need to be any complicated than walking 20 to 30 minutes daily. When medication becomes necessary, oral hypoglycemics are ordered when BG levels are still low enough not to need insulin. All diabetes is real.

    I don’t mean to be argumentative nor lecturing. But whether you accept that premise or not, my point was that I believed the doctor entered diagnosis for this patient and don’t believe, as the patient did, that his doctor ordered such medication to allow him to eat all the cookies and pastries as well as anything he wanted because the medication would take care of it. Nor do I know any doctor who would order such medication to “prevent the real diabetes” without also recommending other modifications.

  • Avatar
    Justin Hamlin

    “I died 5 times in the ambulance.”

  • Avatar
    Justin Hamlin

    Metformin and other hypoglycemics are prescribed to prediabetics to delay onset of diabetes.

  • Avatar
    Justin Hamlin

    Sadly this really happens, exactly as written.

  • Avatar
    Jessica Miller

    ReNeeta Young

  • Avatar
    Serena Perry

    Darn, hate when I catch the “sugas”

  • Avatar
    Serena Perry

    Kill me

  • Avatar
    Christine Olson Owens

    Nothin like a touch of the sugar to ruin your day!

  • Avatar
    Michelle Doyle

    Jillian Lau – get on it!

  • Avatar
    Megan Lorge

    Jenny Nelson

  • Avatar
    Adrian Miclea

    they told me NOT to swallow it

  • Avatar
    Kelly Healy

    Rob Goldstein

  • Avatar
    husaria

    and when it does I always carry a bag of snickers bars with me….” just in case “

  • Avatar
    husaria

    It’s a govt conspiracy I tell ya!

  • Avatar
    Donna Douthit

    Once when doing Med Wreck (OMG I SO don’t miss that!) with a patient who denied the diagnosis of diabetes. When asked why he was taking some oral hypoglycemic, (and ok, I was curious at this point), he said it was to keep him from getting diabetes. His interpretation of what the doctor told him was that it was more or less preventative, to keep him from getting the “real” diabetes in which he’d have to take insulin and it also “counteracted” the sugar he ate. I mean, otherwise, he couldn’t eat cookies and pastries, and who wants that. Now I’m going to show my bias and assume it wasn’t exactly what the doctor really said…

  • Avatar
    Maria Cristina Vazquez-Spitler

    Yeah!!! Where EXACTLY were you that you did not detect the Diabetes virus that attacked me and won’t leave???

  • Avatar
    Valeree Gold Stout

    Had a family accuse the hospital of giving their child SMA (its genetic)

  • Avatar
    Kari Gitlewski

    Omg…. This greatly upsets me. It was almost painful to read

  • Avatar
    Amber Earp Moser

    This is so close to reality that it’s almost not funny.

    3am: (call bell) What do y’all have to eat around here?

  • Avatar
    Amber Earp Moser

    Satire. You read satire from a medical satire site.

  • Avatar
    Edna Wong

    Lolololol

  • Avatar
    errn4christ

    I can’t eat this hospital food, so I ordered a pizza. Ya want some?

  • Avatar
    Misty Fergusson

    If my sugar drops below 250 I feel weak

  • Avatar
    Cathleen Barber

    Funny thing is – I had a pts family actually say something similar. “Mom hasn’t had diabetes in two years, we stopped giving her her medicine and she’s been fine – we don’t even have to test her blood sugar.” I inform them moms BS was extremely high upon arriving. Brother calls sister over, “they’re saying that mom got the diabetes again”. Sister: “well she must have got it here.” Turns to me “what have you all been giving my mom?!” Hand to face – it’s going to be a LONG day.

  • Avatar
    Heather Bocchino-Kish

    What the hell did I just read???!!!

  • Avatar
    Lisa Pennington

    My sugar is fine. 350 is normal for me. By the way, why do I have a fever? 98.5 is a fever for me. I usually run 96.

  • Avatar
    Heidi Callaway Martin

    “I take metformin, but I don’t have no dia-beet-us! I mean, I’ve never had to watch what I eat, and I never have to check my blood sugar! Why are we doing it before every meal? I don’t need insulin. 350 isn’t that bad. It was 550 in the ED!” Smh!

  • Avatar
    Linda Ranne Barberi

    BTW y’all got any Coke? All they keep bringing me is Diet… That’s alright, my family will bring me some.

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